10 November 2010, Vol. 13, No. 11
Table of Contents
Using RootsWeb
Genealogy Tip
Connecting
Bottomless Mailbag:
Readers Write In
Advertisements
What’s New: Databases, Freepages, and Mailing Lists
Volunteer Opportunities
The Darkroom
You Found It
Subscriptions, Submissions,
Advertising, and Reprints
RootsWeb Resources
RootsWeb Helpdesk
Check here for frequently asked questions about RootsWeb.
RootsWeb Newsroom
Check here for the latest RootsWeb news.
RootsWeb Store
Check here for the latest in genealogy books, software, photos, and more.
RootsWeb Review Archives
Check here for previous editions.
Using RootsWeb

By Mary Harrell-Sesniak
“Genealogy is not just a pastime; it's a passion.”

The Veteran's History Project, a Project of the Library of Congress

We celebrate Veteran's Day on November 11 each year – in commemoration of all veteran service, but especially for the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the armistice or peace was declared at the end of World War I.

And in recognition of this, in the year 2000, Congress passed Public Law 106-308, creating the Veteran's History Project (VHP), part of the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress (LOC). The project  

“collects, preserves, and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war.”

So this Veteran's Day, become involved with the VHP. Help by filming a first-hand account of a war memory. And if you are the beneficiary of a deceased veteran's diary, letters, photographs or home movies, think about donating items or transcriptions to the project.

Memorabilia from any of the following conflicts are accepted:

  • World War I (1914-1920)
  • World War II (1939-1946)
  • Korean War (1950-1955)
  • Vietnam War (1961-1975)
  • Persian Gulf War (1990-1995)
  • Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts (2001-present)

All interviews are conducted by volunteers, such as ourselves. And once submitted they are archived by LOC.

To view the catalog of completed projects, follow the “SEARCH THE VETERANS COLLECTIONS” link. Many have been digitized and added to the website. Enter any number of criteria, from the veteran's name to the conflict or era.

The “HOW TO PARTICIPATE” section defines five easy steps:

  1. Register online
  2. Print the Project Field Kit
  3. Prepare for the interview
  4. Conduct the interview
  5. Send the collection to the Library of Congress, keeping a copy for yourself

The Field Kit contains required forms and a printable brochure.

  • Biographical Data Form
  • Veterans Release Form
  • Interviewer's Release Form
  • Media and Formats Standards
  • Audio and Video Recording Log
  • Photograph Log
  • Manuscript Data Sheet

The Frequently Asked Questions contain tips applicable to any oral history project. (Keep these tips in mind as you prepare to see family over the next coming months.) Some excerpts include:

  • It is important to prepare for an interview.
  • Prepare written questions ahead of time, and conduct a pre-interview, if possible.
  • Use the highest-quality video or audio recorder available. Digital and Hi-8 video recordings are preferred. (Extended time speeds and microcassettes are not accepted).
  • Be familiar with and test recording equipment before beginning.
  • Mount cameras on tripods and position a few feet from the interviewee. Focus on the face, upper body and hands, and avoid the zoom feature.
  • For audio interviews, use an external microphone positioned 9-inches from the interviewee.
  • Use a microphone stand, and be sure the tape has started recording before you start speaking.
  • Interview in a quiet, well-lit room and avoid fluorescent lights and extraneous noises, such as clocks, heating / cooling systems, phones, televisions and conversations.
  • Be sure all questions and answers are recorded.
  • At the beginning, state the date and place of the interview.
  • State the name of the person being interviewed, his/her birth date and names of persons assisting.
  • Identify the war, branch of service, rank and where the veteran served. For civilians, record what type of work was performed.

For example: Today is Friday, June 7, 2003 and we are interviewing John Smith at his home. Mr. Smith is 78 years old, having been born on November 23, 1923. My name is Jane Doe and I'll be the interviewer. John Smith is my uncle. He is my mother's brother. Uncle John, could you state for the recording what war and branch of service you served in? [pause for answer] What was your rank? [pause for answer] Where did you serve? [pause for answer]

  • Keep questions short, and avoid complicated, multipart questions.
  • Ask “how, when and why” questions, rather than ones answered by a simple “yes or no”.
  • Don't begin with questions about painful or controversial topics.
  • Be patient and give the veteran time to reflect before going to a new question.
  • Consider asking to see photographs, commendations and personal letters as a way to enhance the interview. Such documents encourage memories and provoke interesting stories.
  • Use follow-up questions to elicit more details. Examples include: When did that happen? Did that happen to you? What did you think about that? What are the steps in doing that?
  • Keep the tape recorder or video camera running throughout the interview, unless you are asked to turn it off. And never record secretly.

Finally, remember this is the veteran's story, and not your own. Make it all about him or her, and avoid interjecting your own experiences.

For more information on Veteran's Day located at RootsWeb, please see Julie's Genealogy – Veteran's Day.

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Genealogy Tip

By Joan Young

Military Databases on RootsWeb and Beyond

For family history researchers, November 11th, whether it’s titled Veteran's Day, Remembrance Day, or Armistice Day, offers an incentive to learn and to share information about family members with military service.

MILITARY DATA ON THE INTERNET:
Worldwide:
http://www.cyndislist.com/milres.htm
USA:
http://www.cyndislist.com/military.htm

MILITARY DATABASES ON ROOTSWEB
Did you know that volunteers have submitted military data to RootsWeb's User-Contributed Databases? You can find a list of the military databases and the submitters here.

The military databases found in RootsWeb's User-Contributed Databases include complete or partial listings of battalion units, bombardiers, ship crews, Army nurses, draft and enlistment records, radar training groups, radio operators and much more. The list of records submitted by volunteers is extensive.

Often the databases are the result of personal research. Once the information is gathered, generous volunteers have decided to share what they have found. Many genealogists send away for records in the course of their research and create a database from the information they have received. Researchers may have undertaken a project to gather information about the crew who served on a specific ship in wartime, or the members of a battalion. Either way, the end result can provide a goldmine of information when submitted for free access and searching at RootsWeb.

You can search all of the military databases in RootsWeb's User-Contributed Databases here.

Or perhaps you have collected military information you would like to share. If you have more than a single document or record listing either partial or complete military data, consider submitting it to the RootsWeb User-Contributed Databases here.

As an alternative, if you have a single document for a family member, you may wish to post it on an appropriate RootsWeb message board selecting the Military classification when posting. 
You may consider posting military data on a surname board, or use an appropriate board found among the Military Topic boards.

Sharing military data is a fitting tribute and remembrance for those who have so selflessly served their country. 

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Connecting
The German Emigrant Database in Bremerhaven

I am of retirement age now, but as a youth I remember my paternal grandparents speaking in German when they didn't want me to understand what they were saying. Decades later, in a discussion with my father I asked how long ago our family had immigrated, citing their command of the German language. My father couldn't say but began reciting the family tree from memory, and I started writing. And my interest in genealogy was born. I was able later to confirm every detail he gave me was dead on, even tracing my family back into the 1700's in Germany. But I was never able to pinpoint the immigration to America.

In your Jan 9, 2008 RootsWeb Review you gave the address for the newly opened German Emigrant Database in Bremenhaven. There (for a small fee) I was able to find my 3rd great grandfather’s date of arrival in Baltimore, who was with him, their ages, where in Germany they had previously resided, the name of the ship they arrived on, and his listed occupation.

Thank you for giving the information that was able to end a 20 year quest.

Thanks to Roger Schumacher
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Bottomless Mailbag: Readers Write In
Getting Organized

I appreciated your article on Organizing Genealogy. [October 2010 RootsWeb Review]

Being a retired engineer and relatively new to genealogy, the geek in me recognized the organization problem fairly early. After a few false starts, I eventually designed and built an electronic "Card Catalog" in MS Access. Scans of all of my source documents are stored in folders on my PC and the database design allows me to locate any of them by surname, type, date, place, etc. Since I also have paper copies in 3 ring binders, the database prints out index reports allowing me to almost instantly locate the paper copies.

Thanks to Ed Schultz in Renton, Washington

Census Transcriptions – Always Check the Image

Last night I was poking around in census records exploring my maternal line.  My grandparents had been married in 1899, so I typed in my grandfather's name for a search of the 1900 census.  His name immediately appeared in a most unusual, to me, at least, census record.  There was an exceptionally long list of names and all were males.  My grandfather was seventh on the list.  My first thought was "Is this for some monster boarding house?" A second look revealed that it was the census record for a military base in the Philippines.  These were soldiers of the 35th Infantry Regiment, US Volunteers, fighting in the Philippine Insurrection (1898-1902) and my grandfather was one of them.  The list began with the Colonel, then a Lieut. Colonel, four Majors, and two Captains, of which my grandfather was one, etc.  But the biggest surprise was to look at the headings at the top of the page to find a very familiar signature in the space for the census enumerator - that of my grandfather.

My next move was to type in my grandmother's name.  Here I found a list from the Washington Barracks, Washington, DC, with the names of wives and their families of soldiers in the Philippines.  Each of the soldiers were listed as heads of the households, but their names were then drawn through with a note that they were in the Philippines.  My grandmother was 21 years old and gave birth to her first child on June 19, 1900.  Since the enumeration date for the 1900 census was June 1, the child was not recorded.

There are at least three transcription errors in the printed display of my grandfather's record.  Always check the original!

Thanks to Woody Thomas in Naples, New York
Where Did This Name Come From?

We have always wondered why our mother's second name was Jackson. She was Hannah Jackson SIMNETT, born in Burton-on-Trent.  We never asked, perhaps we did not know until it was too late.  Mum was never called by her given names, always Nance by Dad or Annie.  Her family in England also never wrote to her by her proper name.

We wonder if it was the midwife’s name, as it is not a family name on either side.  We have had to explain to officialdom why there are two different names on some certificates for the same person.

Thanks to Margaret Stantiall in New Zealand

Thanks to Hunter Johnston in Memphis, Tennessee

Have a story, question, genealogy resource, or tip you’d like to share with RootsWeb Review readers? Send it to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

Editor’s note: The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of the editor or of RootsWeb.com.

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What’s New: Databases, Freepages, and Mailing Lists
New User-contributed Databases at RootsWeb

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 11 Index, 1846-1853
  3897 records; Judy Cendro and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
  http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 1A Index, 1793-1802
4471 records; Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 2 Index, 1801-1803
3999 records; Marilyn Henderson and Judy Lyne for the Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 3 Index, 1803-1806
5547 records; Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 4 Index, 1806-1809
3738 records; Tom Dewlen and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 5 Index, 1809-1813
4111 records; Christine Chambers and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 6 Index, 1813-1817
5091 records; Shirley Colvin and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 7 Index, 1817-1822
6709 records; Jonnie Jones and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 8 Index, 1822-1830
12035 records; Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book 9 Index, 1830-1838
15536 records; Rudy Flores and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan Co., KY, Order Book Index 10, 1839-1846
13537 records; Ruth Harriss and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

KENTUCKY, Logan County. Logan County, KY, Order Book 12 Index, 1854-1860
3354 records; Barb Anderson Curtis and Judy Lyne for Logan Co., KY, Genealogical Society, Inc.
http://userdb.rootsweb.com/courtrecords/

Submit Your Genealogical Data to a RootsWeb Database.

New/Updated Freepages by Individuals

The Towne/Bowditch Genealogy website contains the ancestors of Charles Towne and Jane Bowditch. Surnames represented include Abbot, Bowditch, Burlingham/Burlingame, Dobbeck, Dornan, Hamilton, Hanson, McKinnie, Phillips, Swikert, Town/Towne, Tryon, Williamson, Wise, Woodin.

The Lehigh Valley Cemeteries website has been updated with over 2000 new photos of cemetery markers from Indianland, Lower Saucon Church, Mickley's Church, New Jerusalem Cemetery, St. John's Union Nazareth, Nisky Hill Cemetery, and Williams Church Yard.  The site now contains the complete listing of burials at Schoenersville Cemetery through April 2004, a listing of 2858 names.

If you have a new or substantially revised freepage at RootsWeb and would like to see it mentioned here, send the URL, the title, and a BRIEF description, including major surnames, to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

If your genealogy- or history-related site is located somewhere other than RootsWeb, you can add the link to RootsWeb here.

Request a Free Web Site Account.

New/Updated Websites for Counties, States, and Historical Societies

CAR = Children of the American Revolution
DAR = Daughters of the American Revolution
UDC = United Daughters of the Confederacy

U.S.A.

  • alctcdar — Coweta Town Chapter (Alabama) DAR
  • algmcdar — Gunter Mountain Chapter (AL) DAR
  • azcochtp — Cochise County (AZ) Trails to the Past
  • azgilatp — Gila County (AZ) Trails to the Past
  • azpinatp — Pinal County (AZ) Trails to the Past
  • azsanttp — Santa Cruz County (AZ) Trails to the Past
  • casanjo2 — San Joaquin County (CA) Genealogy and History
  • flbsscar — Blue Springs Society (FL) CAR
  • gafulto3 — Fulton County (PA)
  • iacasstp — Cass County (Iowa) Trails to the Past
  • iafremtp — Fremont County (Iowa) Trails to the Past
  • iamilltp — Mills County (Iowa) Trails to the Past
  • iamonttp — Montgomery County (Iowa) Trails to the Past
  • injacktp — Jackson County (IN) Trails to the Past
  • ladcvudc — David Crockett Volunteer Fire Company Chapter (TX) UDC
  • ncrowan2 — Rowan County (NC)
  • nebutltp — Butler County (NE) Trails to the Past
  • nechastp — Chase County (NE) Trails to the Past
  • necolfa2 — Colfax County (NE)
  • nedougl2 — Douglas County (NE)
  • nehall2 — Hall County (NE)
  • njglouc2 — Gloucester County (NJ)
  • njhunte3 — Hunterdon County (NJ)
  • okhasktp — Haskell County (OK) Trails to the Past
  • paindia2 — Indiana County (PA)
  • papike2 — Pike County (PA)
  • txddudc — Dick Dowling Chapter 404 (TX) UDC
  • txmilltp — Mills County (TX) Trails to the Past
  • txpotdrt — Presidents of Texas Chapter (TX) Daughters of the Republic of Texas
  • vaarlsoc — Descendants of the Honored at Rest in Arlington National Cemetery
  • vaosjdar — Old Saint John's Church Chapter (VA) DAR
  • wilinctp — Lincoln County (WI) Trails to the Past
  • wvjefftp — Jefferson County (WV) Trails to the Past

International

None

Some of these Web pages might not be accessible yet. They are created by volunteers, so if one that interests you isn’t up yet, please check again in a few days or next week. These sites are accessible at www.rootsweb.com/~xxxxxx, where xxxxxx is the account/site name.

Note that the ~[tilde] before the Web account name is required.
For example, the Gunter Mountain Chapter (AL) DAR web site is at
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~algmcdar/.

Request a Free Web Site Account.

New Mailing Lists

New Surname Mailing Lists 

New Regional Mailing Lists

  • AR-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Arkansas Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • ASARCO-MEXICO — In the late 1800's and early 1900's, mining was the keystone of the Mexican economy. In 1899, ASARCO organized as American Smelting and Refining Company. ASARCO had a profound effect on the Mexican economy, thousands were employed by ASARCO and these individuals came from countries from all over the world.
  • AZ-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Arizona Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • KS-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Kansas Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • KY-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Kentucky Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • MA-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Massachusetts Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • NC-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their North Carolina Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • ND-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their North Dakota Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • NE-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Nebraska Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • NV-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Nevada Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • NY-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their NewYork Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • SC-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their South Carolina Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • SD-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their South Dakota Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • TN-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Tennessee Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • UT-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Utah Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • VA-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Virginia Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.
  • WI-INDIAN-CEMETERIES — A mailing list for those searching for their Wisconsin Native ancestors.  Many of the cemeteries have been destroyed over the years.  We may be able to help each other find the graves of lost Indian ancestors.

New Ethnic or Special Interest Mailing Lists

  • BONHAM-DNA  — This list will be used by all interested in "Bonham" DNA possibilities and outcomes. It will be used for spreading knowledge of such.  
  • BRITISH-FOOD  — A list for sharing the food lore and recipes of our ancestors and families from Great Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales).
  • BUNCH-DNA  — The BUNCH-DNA mailing list for the discussion and sharing of information regarding the DNA project for the BUNCH surname.
  • HISTORICAL-BRITISH-EMPIRE  — This mailing list is for discussions regarding the researching and discussing of dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates  and territories of the British Empire from the 16th to the 20th century.
  • NYSCOGO  — New York State Council of Genealogical Organizations. NYSCOGO was formed in 1991 to facilitate communication between genealogical and historical groups. NYSCOGO provides a forum for local and
    state-wide action and interest in the genealogical field.

To find or subscribe to a mailing list, or to search archived posts to more than 30,000 RootsWeb-hosted genealogy mailing lists, go here.

Request a Mailing List.

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Volunteer Opportunities

Are you looking for an opportunity to give back to the genealogy community?
Check this section to learn more about some of our hosted projects and other projects you can participate in.

The World Archives Project is helping to keep the world’s stories alive. You can too by typing information from historical records into searchable online collections that are available to the public for free. Learn more.

New projects to Key:

Alabama Convict Records, 1889-1954

Kansas, Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Post Records, ca 1878-1945

Kent, England, Tyler Index to Parish Registers

New South Wales, Convict Indents, 1788-1842

New Zealand City & Area Directories, 1866-1955

For a complete list of projects to key, and search click here.

If you know of genealogically related volunteer opportunities please email Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

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The Darkroom

This is a picture of my father, Franklin Lee Lightfoot, taken in 1923 probably in Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Notice the leggings and the bandage on his fingers as he stands in front of what is probably the infirmary building. He was only 16 and lied about his age to join the army. One year later he would be Honorably Discharged from the Army for being a minor. Two years later he joined the Navy when he was of legal age.

Thanks to Brian L. Lightfoot in Ceres, California

For a chance to see your ancestor’s photo in the RootsWeb Review, send it to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com. Make sure to include your name and a brief description of the photograph.

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You Found It
Another Einstein?

In searching for great grandfather William A. Lewis (born in Wales in 1833, married Isabella Boyles Davies in Oregon in 1861), I got to the Oregon State Archives and their record of the Oregon State Hospital (insane asylum).  He was admitted in 1892 for one incidence of ‘mania’, but was ‘temperate’ and of a normal, healthy condition.  The medical record says ‘well educated’ and then concludes “Broods over the laws of gravitation and squanders time and money to overthrow Newton’s theory. Neglects his family and suspects his wife.”   He died in the hospital in 1914 (22 years!!); his wife outlived him in Portland to 1928.  Be nice to your wife!!

Thanks to John Lewis Frewing in Tigard, Oregon
Wright Brothers

In the 1880 US Federal Census for Brevard County, Florida, in District 13 there is listed a
Brothers, Wright, age 30 with his wife Mary.
[Editors Note: There is also a 2 year old by the same name in Jefferson County, Louisiana in the same census.]

Thanks to Ann Parkinson in Texas
An Interesting Name

My grandmother (1884-1952) had a childhood friend in Logansport, Indiana, named Goldie Silvie Lacey Murphy.

Thanks to Anne Campbell Slater in Ardmore, Pennsylvania
A Unique Name

My husband's grandfather was born in March, 1892 after a particularly cold winter in North Dakota.  He was as welcome as the spring and they named him William Welcome Nichols.

Thanks to Joan Nichols

Found a funny name or humorous tidbit in old records, or an amusing entry in census, parish, church, or other records? Send these and other genealogy-related humor/humour items to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

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Subscriptions
To manage your e-mail communications (i.e., to subscribe or unsubscribe to this newsletter, or to sign up for others), visit our newsletter management center at any time.

If you use a spam-filtering program, in order to receive the RootsWeb Review please make sure that you’re allowing e-mail from rootswebreview@email.rootsweb.com. The RootsWeb Review is a free publication of Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 360 West 4800 North, Provo, UT, 84604

Submissions
The RootsWeb Review does not publish or answer genealogical queries, and the editor regrets that she is unable to provide any personal research assistance or advice.

RootsWeb Review welcomes short (500 words or less) articles, humor, stories, or letters, and reserves the right to edit all submissions. The announcement of books and products is provided as a community service and is not an endorsement in any way. Pictures for "The Darkroom" should be at least 72 dpi, preferably jpgs.

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Reprints
Permission to reprint articles from RootsWeb Review is granted unless specifically stated otherwise, provided:

  1. the reprint is used for non-commercial, educational purposes; and
  2. the following notice appears at the end of the article: Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 10 November 2010, Vol. 13, No. 11
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