14 May 2008, Vol. 11, No. 15
Table of Contents
Editor's Desk: News and Notes
Using RootsWeb
Genealogy Tip
Connecting
Bottomless Mailbag:
Readers Write In
Ancestor Seekers
What's New: Databases, Freepages, and Mailing Lists
The Darkroom
You Found It
Subscriptions, Submissions,
Advertising, and Reprints
RootsWeb Resources
RootsWeb Helpdesk
Check here for frequently asked questions about RootsWeb.
RootsWeb Newsroom
Check here for the latest RootsWeb news.
RootsWeb Store
Check here for the latest in genealogy books, software, photos, and more.
RootsWeb Spotlight
Know someone who has gone above and beyond in the service of RootsWeb? Nominate them for recognition on our Volunteer Spotlight page.
RootsWeb Review Archives
Check here for previous editions.
 
Editor's Desk: News and Notes
All RootsWeb-Hosted Websites to Receive a Masthead

In August of last year we updated the RootsWeb logo and added new mastheads to all of our freepages and homepages. In the latter part of May we will add the masthead to the remaining pages hosted on RootsWeb (e.g., USGenWeb, DAR, and American History Genealogy Project pages).

The largest hosted projects will have options for specialized mastheads that also include the project's own brand.

Also, based on member feedback, the background color on all mastheads will be changed to a soft grey to minimize clashing with existing colors on the Web pages.

Read all the details on this update and see masthead examples in the RootsWeb Newsroom.

Book Notice

Washington County, North Carolina: Abstracts of Deed Books A-B-C (1799-1814)
By Linda Haas Davenport

Washington County, North Carolina, was formed in 1799. Its courthouse burned three times (1862, 1873, and 1881) and only the deed records were saved each time. Linda Haas Davenport has abstracted the 958 individual deeds found in Deed Books A, B, and C, covering the years 1799-1814, and many deeds from earlier years are scattered throughout the books.

For the researcher's convenience, Davenport has indexed the names in the deeds under four different categories: "surnames," "females," "slaves," and "things and places." This book is a unique and indispensable tool for Washington County researchers.

Find information on how to purchase this book, or view the table of contents, sample abstracts, and a surname index here.

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Using Rootsweb
By Mary Harrell-Sesniak; "Genealogy is not just a pastime; it's a passion."
Researching at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

I recently had the opportunity to visit the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Southeast Region; it was a delightful experience.

Located near Atlanta, Georgia, NARA Southeast is hosted in a magnificent facility. It is attractive and well-organized, and it offers much for first-time visitors (especially if you're researching Georgia, since the Georgia State Archives are strategically hosted next door).

The Southeast Region Archive is growing at the staggering rate of more than 200,000 documents per year (the earliest records date to 1717) and contains records on a variety of local and national topics, including the Atlanta State Penitentiary, the Civil Rights movement, the slave trade, and more. There are many records of importance to genealogists (e.g., passenger lists and land records), and more than 75 percent of visitors are there to do genealogical research.

The National Archives has eighteen branches (go here for a list of the locations). If you haven't yet visited one I suggest doing so at your earliest opportunity. You'll find valuable records, helpful staff, access to computer stations with websites like Ancestry and Footnote (and often free printing!), workshops on family history and researching at the archives, and more.

Here are some things to consider before visiting any of the NARA facilities:

1. Check hours and dates. The NARA Southeast Branch is open Tuesday-Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., but each branch sets its own hours and holidays.

2. Arrive early. If you require the services of an archivist, visit during business hours. Many don't work in the evenings or on weekends.

3. Bring pencils, paper, a laptop, and a digital camera, and be prepared to store coats, purses, briefcases, pens, food, and other personal items in a locker. Pencil and paper is allowed in most research rooms and many allow laptops for taking notes and digital cameras for taking photographs of records.

4. If you want to examine original records, you will have to apply for a Researcher Identification Card while you are at the archive. To receive a card you will need to show your picture ID and fill out a short form stating the purpose of your research. You may be asked to watch a short orientation presentation at some branches. Cards are valid for one year and will grant you access to original records at all of the NARA locations.

5. You may need to call and make a reservation to use the Microfilm Research Rooms. There are usually different photocopying rules for items viewed in the Microfilm Research Room, and most items you view there need to be returned before closing time.

6. Explore the particular NARA branch's website before going to familiarize yourself with their holdings and any other rules or procedures.

7. Check the Archival Research Catalog (ARC) for records before you go. ARC is the online catalog of NARA's nationwide holdings. To date, about 58 percent of holdings in the National Archives and its regional sites are included in ARC, including digitized copies of some original material. Unfortunately, the complete list of holdings will never be online as the archives are growing faster than they can be processed. So, it is still important to check the regional websites; each has a more complete list of its unique records and collections.

8. Write, telephone, or e-mail before you arrive to make sure the site has the records you require. Feel free to ask questions; the staff is there to help you and they are very accommodating.

Each branch of the National Archives carries records of regional interest, but most also contain records of genealogical value. You may discover letters, forms, maps, photographs, drawings, blueprints, lists, reports, and other types of records, including (but not limited to) naturalization, census, military, land, and immigration records, and documents pertaining to Native Americans and other special groups.

If you are researching outside of the U.S., visit the national archives in the country in which you are interested. Some websites of interest to our international readers and researchers are

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Genealogy Tip
By Joan Young
Finding Your SMITHs (and Other Ancestors with Common Surnames)

In Adams and York counties in Pennsylvania, where my MYERS ancestors lived, it is sometimes said that there are more MYERS than people. And my MYERS grandfather had the audacity to marry a SMITH. Researching ancestors with common surnames can be a challenge. Here are some suggestions to help you out:

1) Look for the same given names generation after generation.

It was common for families to give multiple children the same given names generation after generation. For example, in my ARNOLD family, John George ARNOLD and his wife, Elizabeth, named their children Samuel, John, Daniel, Abraham, and Elizabeth (among others).

Their son Samuel named his children Samuel, George (after his father), Abraham, Daniel, Elizabeth (after his mother), and John. Samuel's brother Daniel named his children John, George, Daniel Jr., and Abraham. Daniel Jr. named his children Daniel III, Samuel, Abraham, and Elizabeth. And so it went.

If you find your SMITHs naming their children the same thing for two or three successive generations, search for SMITH families from earlier generations who used those same names. While given names do not necessarily prove a connection, they may lead you to your SMITHs.

(Visit this RootsWeb homepage to learn about other naming patterns.)

2) Search religious records for your ancestors' denomination.

Religion can be an important clue. If your family is Jewish, Quaker, Catholic, or Presbyterian for multiple generations, narrow down your search to church records for your family's religion.

3) Check for occupations that were passed down.

If your SMITHs were consistently listed in census records as millers, carpenters, tanners, glassmakers, innkeepers, or stonemasons, try searching for SMITHs in a previous generation who shared the family occupation. Many trades were passed down in a family, and businesses were often transferred from one generation to the next. A family's shared occupation could be the clue that helps break down your brick wall.

4) Become familiar with the community (and community members) where your ancestor lived.

Last, and quite possibly most important, research the community where your family lived. People traveled in communities, and families intermarried with the same families generation after generation. Do research on the neighbors and church members with whom your ancestors interacted. Research the sponsors at family baptisms and the witnesses on property records and wills.

In my own family, my BORTON ancestors are English Quakers who immigrated to New Jersey in 1679 and intermarried many times over with the HAINES family, who came to New Jersey in 1682. The two families were from the same town in England (Aynhoe), and when I researched their earlier English records I found there had been many HAINES-BORTON marriages even before the two families arrived in America. By studying one of these families I discovered information about the other as well.

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Connecting
Don't Give Up Hope

As a lifelong genealogist, I'd lost contact with one of my Gallaway family research pen pals back in the early 1990s. I retired from the military in 1994 and then relocated out of state in 1995. When I next tried to contact my pen pal, Sue Norman, her letter was returned as undeliverable. Checking the SSDI revealed she had died in 1994. A few years passed and I got a copy of her obituary. I used the details from it to try to contact her daughter in Corpus Christi, but my letter was never answered.

Last week I got an e-mail from the deceased's son, who saw my database posting on WorldConnect. He noted that he found his mom in my database and told me he'd inherited her family history information and asked if I'd like to share research with him. He'll find letters that his mother and I exchanged among her files I'm sure. I'd given up hope trying to contact her children thirteen years ago, but it's never too late. He had just recently caught the genealogy bug. Thanks RootsWeb. You've done it again.

David T. Johnston
Three Sisters Reunited

We were three sisters, only eleven months old, two years old, and three years old in 1957, when our mother died suddenly. Due to family circumstances we were separated. My adopted family had some information on my biological family but no idea where my sisters were or even if they were together. From the age of fourteen I searched for my sisters, sometimes getting small amounts of information, but most of the time finding dead ends. (This was prior to the Internet and home computers.)

In 1999 my oldest daughter put a note on a RootsWeb message board requesting any information about my biological family and used my original last name (which is unusual) and the names of my sisters and myself. She then married, had children, moved all across the country and did not get back to checking her post after the first year.

Almost nine years later, in 2008, my oldest biological sister discovered her biological last name for the first time while looking at paperwork she'd been given by her adoptive mother. She went onto RootsWeb and found my daughter's listing. At that time she didn't even know she had a younger sister.

In the meantime I had fairly given up since I was still running into dead ends and misinformation. I was searching adoption websites, writing letters, and accumulating papers, but finding nothing about my sisters. I didn't even know if they were together or still living.

In January of 2008 my daughter got an e-mail stating, "I think our moms are related." After cautiously asking each other questions, the two realized their mothers were in fact long-lost sisters. I found that both of my sisters had stayed together and been raised in the same family. We have been in touch almost daily since and plan a reunion this Memorial Day weekend.

By Karen Gilbert

Did someone find your genealogy query on the message boards and come to your rescue? Did you find five more generations of your family in WorldConnect? We want to hear your genealogy success stories. Send your family history triumphs to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

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Bottomless Mailbag: Readers Write In
Using a Divining Rod to Locate Unmarked Graves

While doing our family research a number of years ago, we found some hidden cemeteries, but not all the graves. Checking with the cemetery associations or the records of the funeral homes would sometimes give us information. For instance, once we found a note, "Buried beside ----." In the cemetery, there was one tombstone with both names and dates on it. In some cases, there was a list of family members buried in the plot(s), but one stone was missing or had never been placed.

We have found it interesting to try and determine just where the missing person is buried using divining rods. For example, I knew that a woman in my family line was buried next to her husband, but there was no marker for her. According to the divining rods there was no unmarked grave on one side of the husband, but a disturbed area on the other. The wife was probably buried there. Do we know for sure? No—we didn't dig anything up, but the rods have worked in other uses, like in finding buried water lines, electric wires, or irrigation systems.

Has anyone else had successes or failures using divining rods to locate unmarked graves?

Locating a Washman

In the 19 March 2008 issue of the RootsWeb Review, Sandy Williams wrote the following: "I am trying to find out where my great-great-grandfather's middle name of Washman came from. Try putting that into a search engine. I am learning a lot about washing and not much about families with the surname Washman."

Sandy might try using census and deed records to see if there was a Washman family in the neighborhoods where her great-great-grandfather lived.

Eve Mayes, historian with the Athens, Georgia, Historical Society
Interview Tape Located

Several years ago I was given a box of reel-to-reel tapes of fiddle music. Going through the box recently I found a tape of an interview with one Amy B. Fisher. On the box is written the following:

"Interview of Amy B. Fisher by her son John C. Fisher Feb. 1974. Her age 96, 1-13-74.
History of her life and family. Born 1-13-1878, Died 4-2-1978. Was married to Wm. H. Fisher 3-12-1901. One child, John Corbin, born 3-26-02"

The quality of the tape is not the best, but it might be of great value to a descendant if one can be located. Please contact me if interested.

Lew Holt; Salem, Oregon

More on Print Screen

Mary Harrell-Sesniak's "Genealogy Tip" from the April "RootsWeb Review" had good advice for copying and saving items from the Web and other documents. Here's a little more information on creating a "snapshot" from your computer screen.

First, Mary described using the "Print Screen" button to save the entire screen to the clipboard. Try using "Alt + Print Screen"; it will save only the active window to the clipboard.

Second, if you are pasting the screenshot into your Office programs, you can use the "crop" function on the Picture Toolbar to include only the desired area of the snapshot. To get the Picture Toolbar to show up in Word select "Toolbars" from the "View" Menu and then "Picture." To learn more, search for "crop" in the Help.


Difficult Surnames to Research

Editor's Note:

After printing several Bottomless Mailbag pieces about difficult surnames to research using Google, such as Washman, Search, Sales, Driver, and Graves, I received a number of e-mails about other people's difficult surnames.

Here are a few:

WOULD
RECORD
OLDEN
COUNTRYMAN
SIDERS
FREE
FARMER
GROOMS
SESSIONS
BRAND
GERMAINE [Gets lots of hits for St. Germaine Greer]
RACE
PARISH
PLACE
CRABB
GOTHAM
MAINE
SEE

Have a story, question, genealogy resource, or tip you'd like to share with RootsWeb Review readers? Send it to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

Editor's note: The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of the editor or of RootsWeb.com.

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What's New: Databases, Freepages, and Mailing Lists
New User-contributed Databases at RootsWeb

ALABAMA. Madison County. Huntsville. Lee High School, 1976 alumni. 193 records.
Contributed by Paula Lucy Delosh.

VIRGINIA. Stafford County. School No. 11, Hartwood District, Honor Roll, December 1915. 42 records. Contributed by Paula Lucy Delosh.

These databases have come online recently. They are searchable, but not browseable.

Submit Your Genealogical Data to a RootsWeb Database.

New/Updated Freepages by Individuals
No New/Updated Freepages by Individuals

If you have a new or substantially revised freepage at RootsWeb and would like to see it mentioned here, send the URL, the title, and a BRIEF description, including major surnames, to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

If your genealogy- or history-related site is located somewhere other than RootsWeb, you can add the link to RootsWeb here.

Request a Freepage (Free Web Account).

New/Updated Freepages by Counties, States, and Historical Societies

AHGP = American History Genealogy Project
DAR = Daughters of the American Revolution
USGW = United States GenWeb

U.S.A.

  • auspfgs — Port Fairy (Australia, Victoria) Genealogy Society
  • bcswvc — South Western Vancouver Coast of BC (Canada)
  • canswvc — Southwest Vancouver Coast (Canada) World GenWeb
  • engwopcp — Wiltshire (England) Online Parish Clerks Project
  • idfs — Idaho Family Scanners
  • inpikec — Pike County (Indiana) Coal Mining History
  • irlcavan — County Cavan - Ireland Genealogy Project
  • irlkerry — County Kerry - Ireland Genealogy Project
  • ksjcahgp — Jackson County (Kansas) AHGP
  • mnsartel — Sartel (Minnesota) Historical Society
  • njhrna — Hunterdon (New Jersey) Republican Newspaper Abstracts Project
  • njnbndar — New Barbadoes Neck Chapter (New Jersey) DAR
  • scthjdar — Thomas Heyward Jr. Chapter (South Carolina) DAR
  • tnmjcudc — Martin Justus Chapter (Tennessee) United Daughters of the Confederacy
  • txygca — Union Grove Cemetery Association (Texas)
  • uttooele — Tooele County (Utah) USGW
  • vacomdar — Commonwealth Chapter (Virginia) DAR
  • vaemhdar — Elizabeth McIntosh Hammill Chapter (Virginia) DAR
  • watiger — Tiger Historical Museum (Washington)
  • wvfayral — Fayette and Raleigh Counties (West Virginia) Genealogy Society

Some of these Web pages might not be accessible yet. They are created by volunteers, so if one that interests you isn't up yet, please check again in a few days or next week.
www.rootsweb.com/~xxxxxx

Note that the ~[tilde] before the Web account name is required.
For example, the Port Fairy (Australia, Victoria) Genealogy Society website is at
www.rootsweb.com/~auspfgs

Request a Freepage (Free Web Account).

New Mailing Lists

New Surname Mailing Lists

  • AHNERT
  • BAINTON
  • COILEY
  • LINGEBACH
  • MCRILL
  • MILCZEWSKI
  • MULPETER
  • PALLADA
  • PAULETTE
  • REGO
  • REINDL
  • ROLPH
  • SCHRIMPSHIRE
  • SIMPSON-DNA
  • WERE
  • WOUTERS

New Regional Mailing Lists

  • COOK-ISLANDS — A mailing list for anyone with a genealogical interest in the Cook Islands, of the South Pacific Ocean.
  • TOKELAU — A mailing list for sharing information regarding Tokelau, a territory of New Zealand that consists of three tropical coral atolls in the South Pacific Ocean.
  • WALLIS-AND-FUTUNA-ISLANDS — A mailing list for anyone with a genealogical interest in Wallis and Futuna Islands, two groups of islands between Fiji and the Samoas.

New Ethnic or Special Interest Mailing Lists

  • AK-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors to share information regarding Indian tribes who lived in or traveled through Alaska.
  • AL-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors to discuss and share information regarding Indian tribes who lived in or traveled through Alabama.
  • ANCESTRAL-QUEST — A mailing list for sharing information about the Ancestral Quest genealogy software program.
  • AR-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Arkansas.
  • AUS-VIC-WOMENS-HISTORY — A mailing list for those researching women's history in Victoria, Australia, particularly Victorian Women's Suffrage Petition.
  • AZ-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Arizona.
  • CA-EBAYGS — A mailing list for the East Bay (California) Genealogical Society (EBGS), with a focus on education and business matters.
  • CA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through California.
  • CANADA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Canada.
  • CO-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Colorado.
  • CT-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Connecticut.
  • DL-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Delaware.
  • FL-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Florida.
  • GENEALOGY-WEBSITES — A mailing list for discussing genealogy websites that charge for the privilege, even though they say that family researchers can subscribe for free initially.
  • HI-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Hawaii.
  • IA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Iowa.
  • ID-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Idaho.
  • IL-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Illinois.
  • IN-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Indiana.
  • KS-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Kansas.
  • KY-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Kentucky.
  • LA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Louisiana.
  • MA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Massachusetts.
  • MD-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Maryland.
  • ME-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Maine.
  • MI-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Michigan.
  • MN-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Minnesota.
  • MO-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Missouri.
  • MS-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Mississippi.
  • MT-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Montana.
  • ND-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through North Dakota.
  • NE-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Nebraska.
  • NH-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through New Hampshire.
  • NJ-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through New Jersey.
  • NM-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through New Mexico.
  • NV-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Nevada.
  • NY-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through New York.
  • OH-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Ohio.
  • OK-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Oklahoma.
  • OR-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Oregon.
  • PA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Pennsylvania.
  • RI-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Rhode Island.
  • SC-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through South Carolina.
  • SD-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through South Dakota.
  • TX-EMCHS — A mailing list about the East Montgomery County, Texas, area and the families who live and have lived there. It is supported by the East Montgomery County (Texas) Historical Society.
  • TX-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Texas.
  • UT-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Utah.
  • VA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Virginia.
  • VT-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Vermont.
  • WA-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Washington.
  • WI-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Wisconsin.
  • WV-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through West Virginia.
  • WY-INDIAN-TRIBES — A mailing list for anyone researching their Indian ancestors who lived in or traveled through Wyoming.

To find or subscribe to a mailing list, or to search archived posts to more than 30,000 RootsWeb-hosted genealogy mailing lists, go here.

Request a Mailing List.

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The Darkroom

This is a picture of my cousin, Dennis Whyte, from an old Vaudeville newspaper. His partner was Roy Zastrow. They did a dance and comedy act until he teamed up with his future wife, Billie Burns. Dennis and Billie toured the country for many years doing their act, and when Dennis died, Billy told me that, except for two days, they had been together every day since she was fourteen.

Submitted by Walter "Mitch" McGuire

For a chance to see your ancestor's photo in the RootsWeb Review, send it to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com. Make sure to include your name and a brief description of the photograph.

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You Found It
Appropriate Surname

While reading a local obituary, I noticed the gentleman who died was a driving instructor. His name was Rex A. Lott.

Thanks to Joy; Oregon
What a Name

I found this interesting name in a census record years ago: Lovely Hooker.

Thanks to Nancy
Funny Phonebook Names

While looking for an entry in our phonebook years ago, I stumbled upon the name "Gloomy Jones." My mother-in-law was in a nursing home here for several years and Gloomy was also a resident there, so I got to meet him. He died several years ago.

When I showed a coworker Gloomy's name in the phonebook, he turned to the entry for an unusual name he had seen on a mailbox: Turley Curd. The name is no longer in our phonebook and we could not find it in a search of white pages nationwide, so I assume that he is also deceased.

Thanks to Bill
Obituary Humor

On Monday, 28 November 1932, the Bridgewater Bulletin, a newspaper published in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, carried an obituary which read in part, "Her body was taken to Upper Northfield and laid to rest in the cemetery there, followed by her husband and children, relatives and friends."

Thanks to Roger Cunningham

Found a funny name or humorous tidbit in old records, or an amusing entry in census, parish, church, or other records? Send these and other genealogy-related humor/humour items to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

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Submissions
The RootsWeb Review does not publish or answer genealogical queries, and the editor regrets that she is unable to provide any personal research assistance or advice.

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Reprints
Permission to reprint articles from RootsWeb Review is granted unless specifically stated otherwise, provided:

  1. the reprint is used for non-commercial, educational purposes; and
  2. the following notice appears at the end of the article: Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 14 May 2008, Vol. 11, No. 15